Douglas DC-3

800px-Douglas_DC-3,_SE-CFP


The Douglas DC-3 is an American fixed-wing, propeller-driven aircraft whose speed and range revolutionized air transport in the 1930s and 1940s. Because of its lasting impact on the airline industry and World War II it is generally regarded as one of the most significant transport aircraft ever made. Many DC-3s are still used to this day in all parts of the world.

Role Airliner and transport aircraft
Manufacturer Douglas Aircraft Company
First flight December 17, 1935
Status >400 in limited use
Number built 16,079[1]
Developed from Douglas DC-2
Variants C-47 Skytrain
Lisunov Li-2
Basler BT-67

General characteristics

* Crew: 2
* Capacity: 21-32 passengers
* Length: 64 ft 5 in (19.7 m)
* Wingspan: 95 ft 0 in (29.0 m)
* Height: 16 ft 11 in (5.16 m)
* Wing area: 987 ft² (91.7 m²)
* Empty weight: 18,300 lb (8,300 kg)
* Loaded weight: 25,200 lb (25,346 with deicing boots, 26,900 in some freight versions) (11,400 kg)
* Powerplant: 2× Wright R-1820 Cyclone 9 series (earliest aircraft) or Pratt & Whitney Twin Wasp S1C3G in the C-47 and later civilian aircraft, 1,100 or 1,200 hp max rating, depending upon engine and model (895 kW) each
* Propellers: 3-bladed Hamilton Standard 23E50 series hydraulically controlled constant speed, feathering

Performance

* Maximum speed: 237 mph (206 kn, 381 km/h (=Never Exceed Speed (VNE), or Redline speed))
* Cruise speed: 150 mph (130 kn, 240 km/h)
* Range: 1,025 mi (890 nmi, 1,650 km)
* Service ceiling: 24,000 ft (7,300 m)
* Rate of climb: 1,130 ft/min (5.73 m/s) initial
* Wing loading: 25.5 lb/ft² (125 kg/m²)
* Power/mass: 0.0952 hp/lb (157 W/kg)

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